Footprints preserve terminal Pleistocene hunt? Human-sloth interactions in North America.

Bustos, D., Jakeway, J., Urban, T.M., Holliday, V.T., Fenerty, B., Raichlen, D.A., Budka, M., Reynolds, S. C., Allen, B.D., Love, D.W., Santucci, V.L., Odess, D., Willey, P., McDonald, H.G. and Bennett, M. R., 2018. Footprints preserve terminal Pleistocene hunt? Human-sloth interactions in North America. Science Advances, 4 (4), eaar7621.

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DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aar7621

Abstract

Predator-prey interactions revealed by vertebrate trace fossils are extremely rare. We present footprint evidence from White Sands National Monument in New Mexico for the association of sloth and human trackways. Geologically, the sloth and human trackways were made contemporaneously, and the sloth trackways show evidence of evasion and defensive behavior when associated with human tracks. Behavioral inferences from these trackways indicate prey selection and suggest that humans were harassing, stalking, and/or hunting the now-extinct giant ground sloth in the terminal Pleistocene.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:2375-2548)
Group:Faculty of Science & Technology
ID Code:30670
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:04 May 2018 09:08
Last Modified:04 May 2018 09:08

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