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People with enteral tubes and their carers' views of living with a tube and managing associated problems: a qualitative interview study.

Green, S. M., Townsend, K., Jarrett, N., Westoby, C. and Fader, M., 2019. People with enteral tubes and their carers' views of living with a tube and managing associated problems: a qualitative interview study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 28 (19-20), 3710-3720.

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DOI: 10.1111/jocn.14972

Abstract

Background: Nutrition by enteral tube is a complex therapy requiring significant management to ensure safe, timely delivery of nutrients and avoidance of complications. In the home setting people with enteral tubes and their carers are required to self-manage the therapy, including the need to cope with problems that arise. Whilst previous studies have conveyed experiences of people with enteral tubes, few have described views on enteral tube problems. Aims and objectives: Drawing on the findings of a previously reported study (1), this paper aims to describe in-depth the experiences of people with enteral tubes and their carers of living with the tube day to day and managing problems that arise. Design: A qualitative descriptive design using semi-structured in-depth interviews was employed. Methods: A purposive sample of 19 people with enteral tubes and 15 carers of people with tubes participated. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Using a thematic analysis approach, codes were defined and applied; themes developed and refined. Five themes with associated sub-themes were generated, of which one, “living with the tube”, is reported in-depth. The COREQ checklist was used. Results: Participants described the tube affecting both physical and psychosocial being and revealed it had resulted in significant changes to their daily living, necessitating adaptation to a new way of life. Participants reported spending much time and effort to manage tube problems, at times without support from healthcare practitioners knowledgeable in tube management. Discomfort associated with the tube was commonly described. Conclusions: Living with an enteral tube impacts significantly on daily life requiring adaptations to normal routine. People with tubes and their carers use a range of strategies to manage common complications. Relevance to clinical practice: Knowledge and understanding of how people with enteral tubes live with their tube and manage issues as they arise will enable healthcare practitioners to provide better support. What does this paper contribute to the wider global community? The number of people with enteral tubes living at home is increasing globally. People with enteral tubes and their carers are required to manage associated therapy and any issues that arise. Community nurses and other healthcare practitioners care for people with enteral tubes and need knowledge and understanding of the experience of living with a tube and managing associated problems to be able to provide appropriate support.

Item Type:Article
ISSN:0962-1067
Additional Information:SM Green is funded by a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) / Health Education England (HEE) Clinical Academic Training (CAT) Clinical Lectureship for this research project. This publication presents independent research funded by the NIHR
Uncontrolled Keywords:gastrostomy; enteral nutrition; nutritional support; home care services
Group:Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
ID Code:32433
Deposited By: Unnamed user with email symplectic@symplectic
Deposited On:26 Jun 2019 09:18
Last Modified:02 Oct 2019 07:34

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